Easy ways to position yourself as the expert electrician in your area

I often speak to electricians who ask me how they can be a cut above the rest in their local area. There are some very simple ways you can position yourself a cut above your local competition by making a few small changes to the set up of your business.

 

One of the common questions I get asked is “everyone is qualified and registered in my area, how can I beat that?” Whilst all electricians have to meet minimum industry standards – there are things you can do even in this area which will seed in your customers mind that you are the better choice.

 

By following these examples below, you will be seeding in your customers mind that you go the extra mile, not just meeting the minimum standards that other electricians do in your area.

 

  • I turn up in a marked van

Over the years I have spoken to many electricians who drive around in unmarked vans. Sign writing your van is one of the easiest methods of advertising your business. If you don't sign write, you are missing an essential marketing tool for your business. Don't hide what you do, not only does it show a professional appearance, it also reassures your customers when you turn up for quotation visits that you are actually an electrician and not jack of all trades.

 

  • I wear a company uniform

Wearing a company uniform sends a clear message that you take pride in both your work and appearance. Remember it takes people just a few seconds to decide whether or not they will get along with you and first appearance does matter. Wearing a company uniform clearly identifies who you are and stands you apart from the electrician who turns up wearing scruffy clothes

 

  • I am registered with a leading scheme provider

Your potential customers are getting used to the fact that electricians need to be registered and they have a rough idea who the main providers are. Most customers have heard of the NICEIC so being registered with them stands you in good stead. I have always been registered myself with the NICEIC and always will do. There have been a few new players entering the scheme provider marketing arena recently which not even electricians have heard of half the time. A customer is more likely to use your services if they trust your credentials. Scrimping on things that matter can cost you work.

 

  • I have £10m public liability cover

Having adequate insurance cover matters and your customer will want to know they are covered from all angles if something does happen when working in their home. The industry standard is £5m of cover and most electricians meet the minimum standard mainly as it is what the scheme providers request upon registration. For about £35 extra per year, I choose to double my cover and use it as a selling point as part of my quotation visit. No one has to hold £10m of insurance cover, but it tells you a lot about a person if they exceed the standard – it sets you apart from your competition as you are going the extra mile to ensure your customer know they're in safe hands. No one likes the idea of using someone who does the bare minimum especially where their home is concerned.

 

The list goes on.....

By thinking of the way you do business already, think about other changes you can make, there are many areas which you could look at which are easy things to fix in your business:

 

  • Keep your van clean – inside and out.

  • Keep yourself clean and well groomed.

  • Provide printed written quotations which includes a full breakdown of the price.

  • Use good quality materials.

  • Make conversation with your customer to break the ice – if they've got a nice car on the drive – tell them!

  • Be polite and smile.

  • Treat their home with respect

 

It is the small things that will set you apart from other electricians in your area. Too many electricians over complicate their marketing and can waste money in the process. It is the small things that count – and are simple things you can fix in your business that will give you the re-focus that you need when stuck in a rut.